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Extremely Low Testosterone - 24 y.o.
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An_255475 posted:
I've recently gotten results back for extremely low testosterone. I was told that the normal range is 348-1197 (from the ages of 20-85) - in reality, my testosterone for someone my age should be more in the 600-800 range. Currently, my Total T is listed as 197 (that's below the normal T for a 90 year old man), and my Free T is listed as 5.0 (healthy should be 9.3-26.5 - also below the Free T level for a 90 y.o. man).

I'm 24 years old. My sex drive is still rather strong, but I have noticed that occasional I have trouble maintaining an erection during intercourse. My only other sign of low T, is my inability to drop weight...like at all. I eat a pretty healthy diet (no soda, no fast foods, lots of salads [oil and vinegar dressings - non of that creamy BS>, low carbs, high protein) and I work out anywhere from 3-6 days a week. I'm able to maintain a decent amount of muscle, but I just can't shake the weight and it's driving me nuts...this is primarily the reason I went to go get blood work done.

There are a few question I have related to this.
1.) What are likely causes for having such low T?

2.) Is there any natural way to get my testosterone levels back from 197 to 600+?

3.) If I do go on a pill or injection for T, will I have to be on it for the rest of my life, is there any way that I can get off of it?

4.) If I do get my levels back to normal (whether naturally or unnaturally) how will it affect my weight? Will I actually start losing weight?

5.) If I do get my levels back to normal (whether naturally or unnaturally), how will having a normal level affect my life?

I've searched everywhere for these answers but nothings really been comprehensive. Any help would be highly appreciated.

Thank you for any information you might be able to provide.
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counterso responded:
Hormone therapy is the very last resort and not something you want to start until there are no alternatives.

What those ranges are, are AVERAGES. They are not guidelines for where your numbers should be. There are perfectly healthy men at both ends of the spectrum, and it is ONLY your symptoms that should guide you in determining whether your numbers reflect a "problem" or not.

The good thing is it sounds like you had both saliva and blood tests to get a more meaningful reading. The next step would probably be to get a comprehensive panel of hormone levels such as the "Comprehensive Male Profile II" http://www.zrtlab.com/standard-tests/saliva and then discuss the results with an endocrinologist.

Hormone balance is a witch-doctory thing. There is no way to adjust one without affecting all of the others, so it is something that needs to be professionally supervised on a monthly basis if you're trying to make adjustments.

There are a ton of other general health questions that your doctor would be wise to ask you, and they are not related to urology, so this isn't the right forum in which to discuss them.

You say that you want to lose weight, but have shared no information about your height, build, and weight, so it's impossible to determine whether this is just your desire or if there is something out of whack. Remember that working out does not cause you to lose weight, only to trade fat for muscle, which actually makes you weigh more in the same volume.

Again, supplemental testosterone is risky and should be a last resort. The first thing is to evaluate your whole panel to see where contributing factors may be. And an endocrinologist can make a much more informed determination whether there is something wrong, something genetic, or something environmental that has your balance of hormones where it is. Hundreds of factors influence your hormone balance. We usually talk about the major 6, but there are over 600 hormones regulating everything in your body. There is no way for anyone to tinker with that balance without consequences.

Good luck. Sorry this isn't a urology question or easily resolved.
 
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An_255475 replied to counterso's response:
My Physician is currently referring me to a Urologist due to my low testosterone. Why would he refer me to a urologist instead of an endocrinologist?

I am 5' 10 and and currently weigh about 235. I wouldn't say I'm even remotely fat, but I would say that I am a bit overweight. I know trading muscle adds weight, but the more muscle added, should help to eventually burn the fat away. I have also found that it is harder for me to develop muscles than other people...I could hit the gym for awhile a few weeks and not notice any real differences.
 
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vikvaughn replied to An_255475's response:
I think a better place to ask questions like these, and learn is:

http://www.allthingsmale.com/forum/

Sending you to a urologist for this is beyond ridiculous, unfortunately, finding an endocrinologist that is versed in treating men with hormone replacement therapy (well), is a needle in a haystack.

It does look like your T numbers are low, but if you are going to get treated, you are going to have to be well versed YOURSELF, in this. As there are only a handful of doctors out there I would trust with being treated by..
 
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counterso replied to vikvaughn's response:
Vik is right, the GP doesn't know what to do and lumps testosterone in with urology, when it's not.

5'10" and 235 pounds is obese. Even someone with a large frame should be between 151-180 at that height. You are more than 55 pounds overweight for your height. The more fat you have, the more estrogenic your body becomes, suppressing testosterone production and amplifying the issue.

Please schedule an appointment with an endocrinologist. This is not a urology issue.


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