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Micropenis
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An_152477 posted:
I'm wondering how many people know of this birth defect? It's not a laughing matter, but even some Doc's think it is. This defect causes an erection to be 1.5" at the smallest and 3.25" on the large side. So intercourse is almost impossible.

Ever hear of it?
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counterso responded:
Yes. It exists. It is not a "birth defect" but a symptom of an uncommon isolated growth hormone deficiency or a genetic syndrome. It often appears with other anomalies.

If causes are not treated as a child, it is likely not treatable.

Do you have a question or were you just complaining?

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/923178-overview
 
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jtc1003 replied to counterso's response:
I'm not just complaining. I'm trying to make knowledge of this condition common. That way when a young woman sees it maybe she will do more than just laugh. It's a terrible thing to have, and it ruins a man's life. Most of my life it didn't even have a name. And as far as I know, medical researchers aren't trying to do anything about it.
 
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jtc1003 replied to jtc1003's response:
counterso, Why do you say it's not a birth defect? I think it is. It ruins a person's life. I also found out there's a female version of this. It's more rare than the male version, and easier to keep secret. Maybe we finally can do something about babies born like this. We can now effect a baby's genes. So maybe it can be prevented. My life has been unbearable due to this. I always kept it a secret. No more. I'm an old man. Hopefully I'll die soon. But before I do, I want this to be known of.
 
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counterso replied to jtc1003's response:
It is certainly known within the medical community. A WebMD Exchange is not a place where any woman will ever research this condition or become educated about it.

In the U.S. about 1 in 33 babies is born with some birth defect. The problem that causes the penis not to grow occurs after birth, not during gestation, which is probably why it's not considered a birth defect, and instead a hormonal/growth issue, possibly related to a genetic issue related to hormonal development. It's estimated that 1 in 2000 men have this condition, but the number isn't really known because it often goes unreported. It occurs with varying degree of severity, and is just one end of the statistical curve of penis size.

I'm sorry to hear this has made you unhappy. This is an issue that can currently be dealt with when the boy is still a young child, but if parents do not have regular medical care for their children, it may never be noticed until it is too late to change growth patterns. Often it is detected because of other symptoms related to hormonal issues related to growth, not typically just because of penis size, since penis development is not a predictable measurement.
 
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jtc1003 replied to counterso's response:
I hope you're right and something can be done after birth. That's all the more reason to make this public knowledge. I'd say the dead give away is when Docs say the penis is too small for circumcision. If that's true, it's probably a case of micropenis.

When I was born this condition didn't even have a name. I think I was 30 before the medical profession gave it a name. It's too late for me, because I'm 60. But I know from the sexuality and relationship board this is still happening, and I never heard of a Doc treating the infant.

I may live 20 more years, or maybe not. But I intend to make this well known before I die.


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