Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
20 year old with developmental delay?
avatar
An_225868 posted:
My 20 year old daughter has been treated for ADHD since she was in 6th grade. She is now in her 3rd semester as a 2nd semester freshman (this means that she has not yet gained enough credits to get past her freshman year...due to her failing the classes). She is not lazy but has no self motivation skills and is resistent to my offering assistance. She will not do anything without reminding or coercing. A family memerber who came to visit recently suggested that she seems to be developmentally delayed. I am not sure where to go with this idea. But would like to know if there is some place that I could take her where this could be evaluated.
Reply
 
avatar
Annie_WebMD_Staff responded:
Hi Anon_131173,

You may want to ask your questions on our WebMD ADD/ADHD Community . Be sure to click on the related ADD and ADHD Health Center link toward the bottom of that page too for more helpful information.

- Annie
 
avatar
An_244946 responded:
I have no answer to this and I know your post was 1 year ago, but it struck a chord with me. Did you get any answers?

My daughter in 23 now and dropped out of college, just not able to motivate herself to attend classes or get to exams on time. It was not the course as she lacks the ability of motivate herself or take responsibility. The lack of life skills makes her depressed and she sleeps a lot (12 hours a day) and is on anti-depressants. Her lack of ability to attend to anything is really reminiscent of a 12-year old. When she was 12 she just seemed like a normal 12 year old, As she grew up her intelligence developed but her life skills seemed to stay at a 12-year old level. Now she is totally disjointed from what the world expects of her - self motivation, responsibility, timeliness, self-reliance. It is like telling a 12-year old to get a job and look after themselves. She understands her problem very well and is frustrated, angry and depressed that she can't pull herself together, but she just doesn't seem to be able to. She feels life is passing her by. My question is - is this unique? Are we the only family to experience this problem (which does seem like a clinical condition to me), and what is the way forward? We desperately want to help our daughter.
 
avatar
Olivia_WebMD_Staff replied to An_244946's response:
Hi and welcome to the WebMD Community!

I have been reading a lot lately about Executive Function in regards to both my son and my college-age daughter. From what I have read, some kids can fake it for quite a long time, and then suddenly realize they are in over their heads and can't organize themselves.

Check out that link and then I'd recommend posting to Dr. Roy Benaroch on our Parenting community . Though your daughter is older, she's still your kid.

Have you tried getting her in to see a psychologist for evaluation?

I hope this helps.

Take care,
Olivia


Helpful Tips

Was this Helpful?
3 of 3 found this helpful

Helpful Resources