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    Throat congestion
    avatar
    liseu posted:
    Reading all this gives me little hope I have congestion that starts the second I go outside mostly when I get on my car. I thought I was allergic to something in my car but I have a new one now. I was diagnosed with acid reflux but I disagreed so I had an endoscopy and I have allergic esophagitis, they think that's the cause, I am not convinced. I have seasonal allergies but they think I'm sensitive to a food too. I'm currently trying to stay away from wheat dairy eggs and nuts. My congestion is the same. No reason to type what meds I've tried because I've tried them all. I'm also in year 2 of allergy shots. Seems very much like allergies because literally within seconds of going out to my car I begin clearing my throat and coughing up mucous but no one thinks so (ENT doc, allergist, gasteoenterologist) all have a different diagnosis. I just want to know what it is so I can make it go away.


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    FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

    For more information, visit the Duke Health Asthma and Allergies Center