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    Non-Family Question
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    An_262291 posted:
    Greetings - we work in a museum with elderly docents. One of our regulars for years now is showing signs of forgetfulness, short temper, screwing up tasks she's done wonderfully for years, and combative with the other people on her team (same ones for many years). This past week, she pushed a rolling rack into one of her coworkers, apparently intentionally. Her coworker no longer wants to work with her. We're not sure how to handle it, especially since she's not a family member. I'm not sure if we're familiar with her family members or not. I feel approaching her on it will set her off. Suggestions?
     
    avatar
    davedsel2 responded:
    I believe this would be best discussed with the docent's supervisor. If that is you, then discuss this with the museum curator or director. The family will need to be notified of this behavior, but it also needs to be addressed. The supervisor or museum curator/manager needs to discuss this with the docent in private and in person asap, IMHO.
    Please click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

    Blessings,

    -Dave
     
    avatar
    davedsel2 replied to davedsel2's response:
    Also be aware that until a person is officially diagnosed with any form of Dementia, such as Alzheimer's Disease, they ARE legally responsible for their actions and should be held accountable. After an official diagnosis, that legal responsibility is gone and they CAN NOT be held responsible for their actions.

    This is further reason that management needs to address this issue asap and inform the family.
    Please click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

    Blessings,

    -Dave


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