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    MAXAIR replacement
    avatar
    sgbl88 posted:
    Hello everyone,

    I just wanted to let everyone that used to use Maxair that Teva has finally come out with a somewhat comparable replacement - ProAir RespiClick. Of course MaxAir was pirbuterol not albuterol, but it is awesome to once again have an inhaler that does not require a spacer! This is also an excellent option for people (especially kids) who struggle with the coordination of actuating an inhaler and breathing in as the inhaler is a powder and therefore is breath activated.

    I am not a fan of powder inhalers, but for the convenience of not needing a spacer I will be trying it. If I remember correctly the inhalation rate for powders is slower than for other inhalers or the power will hit the back of the throat and not reach the lungs.

    Here is the link if anyone is interested in checking it out.
    http://www.myproair.com/respiclick/default.aspx


    Sonya
    Sonya


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