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    Orgasm triggers lower back pain
    avatar
    An_189543 posted:
    I've had lower back problems for more than 20 years, starting when I was 17, that were mostly fixed by a surgery at 21 that fused L4 and L5/S1 lumbar vertebrae. About 3 years ago I reinjured my back while exercising but a year ago this September after 2 years of misery received an injection in my sacroiliac joint that pretty much took care of the bad pain. However, the last month or so I have noticed that shortly after I have an orgasm (through masturbation--no acrobatics involved, lol) my pain gets very bad again for several days to a week or longer at a time. Eventually it gets better, but the obvious answer would be "don't have an orgasm if it makes your pain worse" but I have prostate issues that require me to ejaculate regularly or have problems in that area. Last night I had an orgasm and I could hardly get any sleep due to pain, which still is bad 24 hours later. I'm not clear on why an orgasm would kick off back pain, but maybe some nerves are being aggravated? Any thoughts/suggestions would be most welcome. Thanks!
     
    avatar
    davedsel57 responded:
    Hello.

    Just gotta ask...are you doing it backwards?? Just joking.

    Seriously, this is something you should discuss with your doctor. WebMD does have a member created Man to Man topics exchange here: http://exchanges.webmd.com/man-to-man-topics No Health Expert monitors this board, though, and I'm not sure if anyone there can offer advice or not.

    Bottom line, see your doctor and discuss this.
    Blessings, -Dave
     
    avatar
    nagle5000 responded:
    Hi Anon --

    Two thoughts come to mind (I've been thinking a little a bit about the anatomy and physiology of sex recently.)

    1. Some people when having sex moan in a way that contracts their abdominal muscles, and some people sigh (relaxing the abdominal muscles.) On genital stimulation, people tend to vocalize much more, and will have their attention on the pleasurable stimulation and suddenly realize pain in their body post-orgams.

    You may try to find the action of moaning -- if you moan during sex / masturbation -- and see if that's aggravating back pain.

    2. You could isolate using the Pubococcygeus muscles via Kegel exercises -- as I understand it, these are involved in male orgasm. (I don't know this really well though; you should double-check this.) I believe the simple description of Kegels is to do the action of holding in urination and releasing in sets of 10 -- you may see if that triggers the pain.

    The guiding idea here is breaking down masturbation into its component parts and seeing if any of those particular functions of orgasm can be isolated as what's causing pain -- this gives you a next step to work with.

    I'd be happy to keep brainstorming with you. Let me know.


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