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    Similar injury.
    avatar
    Bpappe posted:
    Hi. I am a 22 year old female. I also broke my t12 and l1 in a serious car accident and had to have an emergency spinal fusion. I am 4 weeks out of surgery now, feeling better than expected but still very much in pain. My family has a history of back problems and osteoporosis. I am worried that down the line my back will be very bad. I worry so much that I actually changed my major in college. I was working in a day care and a server at a restaurant and close to my degree in child development but decided to change my major to something else. My doctors are not very helpful as their bedside manner is terrible.

    Do I need physical therapy? My upper back between my shoulder blades has been hurting, can I get a massage? Is it normal for my hips and knees to be hurting or is it from the accident? They prescribed me oxycodon, and I'm only taking them at night, but how do I know when to stop taking my meds if they want me to stay ahead of the pain? It's all so confusing.

    This is my first broken bone, and my first major surgery.
     
    avatar
    Kat23429 responded:
    Your knees and hips are likely hurting from taking on extra pressure while your back heals. When my twin had spine surgery, her pain really didn't get better significantly until after 3 months, but she is obese. (I have similar problems, but no surgery yet, thankfully!)

    Physical therapy is so important, but if that is not an option for you, there are simple yoga and pilates exercises to help stretch and strengthen your back and core muscles, which can relieve pain. The meditation part of those exercises also increase blood flow and relaxation of tight muscles. If you can get a massage, simply make the therapist fully aware of where your pain is located and that less pressure at surgical site. If you can, alternate taking naproxen (Aleve) every 12 hours and acetominophen (Tylenol) 6 hours in, you may be able to use less of the oxycodone and stay ahead of the pain without as much risk of dependency on stronger drugs. I hope this helps, I am managing severe spinal stenosis and multiple herniated discs similarly.
     
    avatar
    editor_morgan responded:
    Hi Bpappe,

    I'm so sorry that you've been experiencing so much pain. I'm really glad that you are inquiring about physical therapy. You can read more about how physical therapy is sometimes used to treat pain .

    If you are curious about the various types of physical therapy, then you can read more about that here .

    If your doctors are not very helpful, I would consider seeking counsel from a medical team of doctors who are willing to answer your questions. You are the patient and you deserve to have your questions answered in a timely manner.

    Please keep us posted. We care about you and we are here for you!


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