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    fuhrman's products
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    max9821 posted:
    I am disturbed by fuhrman's sale of several supplements and products. Isn't this what got dr. Mercola into trouble (among other things)? I think it is unethical. His latest blog recommends not eating protein powders to build muscle but does recommend pine nuts. Oh. What a surprise. Right there next to the article is a picture of a bottle of pine nuts with his name on them. And not just any pine nuts. Mediterranean pine nuts.

    I guess I put fuhrman in the dr. Oz category.

    dolores
     
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    jc3737 responded:
    Dolores,I wouldn't be too hard on Dr Fuhrman.Thr real issue is who is right,and wrong, about what.The only thing I KNOW for sure he is wrong about is potatoes,but then he got caught up in the confusion about glycemic index....but we can excuse that since so many others did also.I suspect he will correct that position in the next several years.

    After all he did stick to his position about sodium even when so many studies were coming out saying low sodium was harmful.Now that those studies have been exposed his stance is looking stronger....and the dead giveaway was the healthy African societies that get very low amounts of sodium.

    And we still do not know who will turn out to be right about the dangers of too low fat or the idea of nutrient density,and the need for some raw greens every day.
     
    avatar
    max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
    Africans societies get along well on very low sodium because Africans and those of African descent retain sodium which is an evolutionary benefit in a very hot climate. To sweat and lose sodium where salt, over the past thousands of years, was largely unavailable would not be conducive to long life or good health. Which is why American blacks are so prone to hypertension. In this environment the evolutionary adaptation to retain sodium can be deadly in an environment where salt costs less than fifty cents a box and is universally available. Which is not to say that salt is a health food for any of us.

    Sorry, while not maintaining that all Fuhrman's advice is self serving, I do have to be suspicious when the recommendation for what to eat is accompanied by that product under his brand name in a picture next to the recommendation. Doctors are constrained from selling products that they are recommending and I am surprised he has not been caught at it. The latest with the pine nuts is a blatant example.

    Dr. McD says no one has to consume omega three supplements but Fuhrman advises the consumption of DHA--which he just happens to sell.

    His Andi scale is proprietary and he asks us to take his word for what he has devised. Why you have to blend foods rather than eat them, except if you like the taste of certain things blended, seems ridiculous. The same with juicing which he does not recommend of course. Why you can't just eat a bunch of kale and an apple and whatever else is in his smoothies I do not know. Unless the quantity if eaten separately is too great to be eaten at one sitting. In which case it probably was not meant to be eaten in those quantities.

    dolores
     
    avatar
    jc3737 replied to max9821's response:
    I know the ANDI scale is speculation and I have no idea how long it will take before we know who is right about that....but I think Essee recommends lots of leafy greens for heart disease.

    You are involved in an experiment now to see which diet is best for heart disease and diabetes since you have both.You changed from the Fuhrman diet to the McDougall low fat diet after coding.It may be that extreme low fat is necessary for those with extensive heart disease,but may not be the best diet overall for those without heart disease.

    Did you read the post on sodium?
     
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    max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
    I was for the longest time on mostly plants but never was on the fuhrman diet unless you consider eating fish and some nuts on occasion (and off plan stuff on occasion). I do not know if you could strictly call what I eat now either fuhrman or McDougall because I eat a whole lot more greens and other vegetables than McD recommends but eat a lot more potatoes and rice etc than fuhrman recommends. I eat no animal foods nor do I eat any fats or oils or nuts or avocados. I do eat some flaxseed when I remember.

    I do not use the salt shaker but do use Macilhenny tobascao and chipotle sauces and also different mustards. So I am not zero salt. Which I would be if I could enjoy unseasoned food. And I do worry about missing iodine. Wondering if I should have dulse every now and again.

    Another thing to think about is the fact that apes have two genes coded for amylase and humans have anywhere between two and fifteen with an average of six. So those on the very low end might not be good candidates for a high starch diet. Especially diabetics. But this is something you would only know if you were tested I guess.

    dolores
     
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    jc3737 replied to max9821's response:
    I thought you allowed more fat than McDougall recommends ....more like Fuhrman....before coding.

    Whats wrong with 150mcg of potassium iodate?...I guess dulse is OK but you can't control the amount as well.

    "I eat a whole lot more greens and other vegetables than McD recommends but eat a lot more potatoes and rice etc than fuhrman recommends"

    Same for me...I combine the two diets and take the best from each.
     
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    max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
    http://www.thyroidresearchjournal.com/content/6/1/10

    the above is re KIO3

    Yes, on occasion before coding I did use fat from salmon, nuts, a little olive oil, occasionally and egg or two. Bad.

    dolores
     
    avatar
    jc3737 replied to max9821's response:
    The only reason I take Potassium iodate is for the iodine content so the study does not apply for those who take it strictly as an iodine source.Taking it in small amounts 150mcg ....mcgs and not mgs prortects from harm due to toxic amounts.But since potassium iodine offers additional benefits that potassium iodate does not I might as well change to it....if i can find it in 150mcg capsules.
     
    avatar
    jc3737 replied to jc3737's response:
    I checked to see what I'm taking right now and its "Natures Plus" brand of potassium iodine.I changed brands last time i ordered so now i have the more beneficial type of iodine supplement potassium iodine....the change was a lucky accident.
     
    avatar
    max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
    cranberries, which I don't eat because I can't eat them without sugar, have lots of iodine if grown near the sea. A couple of medium potatoes have almost one hundred percent of the daily need for iodine in the skins. I am guessing that this too depends on where and how they were grown but fortunately we get food from all over the place and I hope they all do not come from mineral deficient soils. There are also small amounts of iodine in lots of the other foods we eat.

    dolores


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