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    irritable bowel syndrome
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    maddiewho posted:
    does anyone have symptoms so bad they are afraid to leave the house, or affecting their job?
     
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    Pain2much responded:
    I would like to know how to get on SSI? I have not worked for over 15 years now. I worked all the way up to 1994. I have suffered from this for too long now. I am married, but i would like my own money. Could someone tell me if I would be eligible or not?
     
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    cheryllynn37 responded:
    I have a couple suggestions that may help someone out there. I have found that drinking perppermint tea can help with cramps and gas. Im not crazy about the taste of peppermint, but hey when you are miserable as we all know we can be, I can live with it. I drink it cold or warm. Also, i went to a specialist once, which was all I could afford and he told me to blend up the following in a blender and drink 6 tbs a day: 1/2 c OJ, an orange, an apple with peeling, some rasberries or blackberries or a box of raisins whichever you prefer and a 4 oz container of any yogurt with active cultures and 8 prunes (which i hate,but you really dont taste it) it helped for a while then i guess my body got used to it and it wont work anymore. Maybe it will help someone esle out there. I feel for you all, this rules my life and my fiance also has it only he has constipation to the point he gets to sick to eat or get out of bed, the doc just tells him to take miralax, which sometimes helps but he is still miserable, you may try that if you have constipation, i have the exact opposite and i have the diareha so we are both sick all the time and at least we have eachother, we know what eachother is going thru so we are understanding of eachother when we get sick and we dont go out much cuz one of us is always sick, we cant go out to eat cus im immed in the b/r with cramps so bad i want to die. I am blessed in this aspect to share this with someone i dont have to be embarassed to talk about it, we take care of eachother. That is important b/c this stuff takes its toll on your body and your mind and is very depressing. The only way i stay at work is to eat immodium like candy and take pain pills for the cramps. Hope my 2 suggestions help someone out there. Its amazing how many people have this prob and how people who dont, act like you are making it all up for attention. Why would anyone make up something so embarrassing? Stay well and good luck to u all. knowing your not alone helps. anyone wants to email me, im at [email protected]
     
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    cheryllynn37 responded:
    I have intermident FMLA but they made me a part time empoyee and took all my benefits and punished me for being sick. its so unfair! I work at a call center but dont take back to back calls, so im lucky in that aspect, i just got a slip from my doc saying i have ibs and may have to take many bathromm breaks or go home or miss work b/c of this. Its embarassing but what can you do? I have 2 kids so i have to work. I am planning to take online training in my spare time to be come a medical biller so i can work from home b/c i cant handle working like this anymore. It sucks, so I feel for ya. Maybe you can get a doc note and talk personally wth your boss/supervisor and maybe they would understand and work with you. sometimes people are just to embarrassed to talk about it but you have to keep your job its worth a try. Good luck to you!
     
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    poohbayb responded:
    Yes I do, I can't go to work, or go to college(that's why im going to college online). I always have to get a doctors note to excuse me from Jury Duty. I don't go do anything with my husband because of my IBS, and I'd just love to go garage selling or help him at his business. It's just really hard to do anything, i would also love to go shopping with my girls but everytime I go somewhere I have to make sure that I know where the bathroom is just in case i have to go.....it's just really inconvenient to have...
     
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    CNfromNH responded:
    Yes! That was me until just recently. I was diagnosed with IBS ten years ago and was following what I thought to be an IBS-friendly diet but my symptoms just kept getting worse -- to the point where I couldn't leave the house unless I knew where all the bathrooms were between my house and my destination. I finally went to a gastroenterologist who did a very thorough workup (blood and stool samples in addition to the obligatory colonoscopy) and found that I had major sensitivities to wheat and oats -- two grains I had been consuming in abundance on a daily basis because they were ingredients in foods rich in soluble fiber! I strongly suggest you find a doctor who will listen to you and work with you to pinpoint your specific intolerances. IBS seems to be a label that is assigned when no one knows what's causing your distress.
     
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    lexi_daisy responded:
    I have spent the last 3-4 years afraid of having an "issue" far from the comfort of my home. I have IBS-D and at one time had an accident if you will and it has since scarred me. My life spun into a depression and I would have panic attacks in all sorts of social situations. It never kept me from leaving my house completely but I methodically started limiting my activites to only places I KNEW has a restroom and that I had memorized where that restroom was. Up until about a year ago I thought I was doing fine in this little world I had created until my new husband started getting concerned about my constant anxiety and limitations. Between him and my parents they finally convinced me to see a doctor. Not only did the dr put me on anxiety pills (which really helped) I started seeing a psychologist after a lot of convincing. Both of these things have helped me tremendously and there are times where the old me would have had panic attacks or been so anxiety stricken I would not have left the house; or would have left the situation. Being calmer has helped me get a better handle on what is a true emergency and what is just my anxiety revving into high gear. The best of luck to you.
     
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    hickory34 responded:
    I have had IBS for about 10 years, ever since I started taking Metformin for diabetes. It gave me diarrhea and acid reflux. I have stopped the Metformin and now use insulin. I have still been having these same problems but I decided to try Activia... and guess what, I believe it is really helping me. I thought it was worth a try and I am pleased.

    I think it might be very helpful for everyone to at least give it a try and hopefully it will help.

    Good luck!
     
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    vettechick47 responded:
    Yes! All last year after my father passed away my IBS kicked into high gear!. Anti-diarrhea meds would only work for an hour at a time, so I planned my shopping trips to be quick and then get back home. I stopped getting my nails done because I didn't know how long I could sit there. I only walked my dog at night, in the dark in case of an accident. Then my Dr put me on steriods and I started taking Probiotics and Metamucil. My diet is carefully monitored and I don't eat meat aymore. Life is good again!!
     
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    cookies4M responded:
    You are not alone - there are many IBS patients who are almost housebound, and I was one of them. A big factor for most people with IBS is the brain-gut connection. There have been many research studies showing that the digestive system - the gut - is interconnected with the brain, and that IBS patients have a dysfunction in how they communicate with each other. For many people, like myself, just the thought of having to leave the house would start my gut pain and urgency.

    I have had IBS since 1983, and after years of treatments and meds that only helped short-term, if at all, I was about to give up. I had taken not only IBS medication, but also meds for off-label use because they helped with urgency. I also was put on various SSRIs for IBS, which was really hard on my system and didnt even touch my IBS symptoms. In fact, I didnt think I had IBS because I was in so much pain - I had 4 colonoscopies, and even a trip to Mayo Clinic which confirmed my diagnosis. I almost wanted it to be something else because how could I feel that bad with something "functional."

    Back in 1999, my gastroenterologist told me to research on the internet because he had run out of options for me. It was there that I found out about clinical research studies using clinical hypnotherapy to help with IBS symptoms - not only motility issues (diarrhea, urgency and /or constipation, but also pain and the anxiety that comes with having IBS.

    At the time I learned about this research, I felt it was a bit "out there" but I also knew I was tired of feeling as I did and found out about a course you can use in the privacy of your own home. This was developed in England and is the IBS Audio Program 100 - there are many positive independent reviews on the internet on several IBS websites and support groups. You can also find out about the program at IBSCDs.com for more information. The program was developed when many IBS patients were too sick to travel for in-person therapy, so they were put on tapes back in 1998 and just sent out to patients. Since that time, there have been many people who have been helped and got their lives back - and many who no longer have food "triggers" or special diets.

    It is not a cure, it is not for everyone, not all are helped - BUT - the vast majority of people who use the program have found relief or even elimination of their symptoms and there are no side effects. At the very least it will help with sleep and coping with the condition. I went from about 4 hours almost every day of intense pain and urgency, to now, only a few short lived attacks a month - and they are no where near the long, painful episodes they used to be. But I have talked to others who even have had better results than I did - so that is very encouraging.

    The one extra I found, was trying to explain IBS to family members who were tired of me feeling sick and their not understanding - this program has a session called the IBS Companion, which explains the IBS condition to others - and that in itself was so comforting and helpful.

    Hope this helps - there is hope for feeling better - and helping to ease IBS irritable bowel syndrome symptoms and the anxiety and pain that is a part of it.

    Take care.
     
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    rachel_eash responded:
    Maddy, hello to you. I have suffered with IBS for several years tried everything known out there, nothing helped until one day a friend gave me some imodium prescription strength.....It relieved the cramping and the diarrea instantly........I also removed myself from a stressful situation I rarely have an episode anymore.....I also used a heating pad constantly it really helped relieve alot of the cramping.....I went off all meds gave up coke a cola, and all sweetners went to all natural sugar now I am leading a pretty normal life.....Hope this will help you and others out there who are suffering with this terrible life altering disease........Best of luck please let me know if this works for you...
     
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    whitebuffalolady responded:
    I know exactly what you are going through. I had Ulcertive Colitis. Every time I went out , I had to make sure I knew where the rest rooms were. Sometimes I still didn't make it. I was with my 3 sisters- in- law shopping and had to leave the line and run for the bathroom. Needless to say, I didn't make it. I was so embarrassed. They came out and we went straight home. I learned to stop eating a lot of things that set it off. Nuts, fruit with skins, beans, peas, milk, dairy foods, ice creams, greasy foods. Some of these foods could cause other problems, like gallbladder, or milk intolerance. Anyway, I finally got so bad, I had my colon removed and after 2 other surgeries, had the small intestine connected down below. I had a bag for about 1 1/2 years. I regained my weight and am better than I was before. No more bag now. I can eat things again I haven't eaten in a long time, but still have to watch. Nuts are really hard and salads are bad. I eat them , but not often. I can't drink alcohol and I don't smoke. I take extra pills for B vitamins , potassium, magnesium, Zantac and nexium. You need to eat more wheat breads, whole grain cereals, stay away from greasy foods, like fries, hamburgers. Go to turkey bergers. Try to eat veggies without a skin on it. I don't know if this helps, but thought I would let you know you are not alone. There are many people out there that don't know this is what is causing them trouble. My 2 boy's have the beginings of this too. One was tested, and the other won't go. Cheer up. you have to change the way you think and react to things. Stress only makes it worse. Good luck to you all.
     
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    2000melanie responded:
    I feel for you. I was diagnosed 5 years ago. I had mild stomach upset from teens on, but started having diarrhea, urgency symptoms after eating or drinking, and stomach pain after the birth of my 1st child. I have found some relief with information from heather's ibs website. Using fiber supplements has helped alot, however it has not stopped all symptoms. The hypnosis tape from her website has helped too. IBS effects my job. However I am able to move about, and can run to the bathroom when needed. But I do feel drained after an episode and it effects my work. The pain prior to episodes is not easy to deal with either. On a really bad day, I use Immodium. But I am afraid to use it too much, in case it might not work down the road. So, most times I just tough it out. My gastro dr. was not helpful at all. He ran all kinds of tests which was good, but told me all I could do was eat more fiber. Everything I learned, I learned on my own via the internet. More dr.s need to receive more information on this disease. I am afraid to leave the house, it is hard to lead a normal life. My family is supportive thank goodness. But I know what a normal life was like, and I miss it. Hopefully a treatment will be found one day soon.
     
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    Lingua responded:
    I developed IBS in 1988 as part of CFIDS, and it slowly began to take over my life. I had the "Peruvian mudslides" with increasing frequency, to the point that I was also afraid to make plans to so much as leave home for errands, because I never knew what to expect on a given day. It would come on with very little warning and leave me so weak I could barely function. I kept eliminating foods that seemed to irritate my sensitive colon, until I was hardly eating anything, certainly not a balanced diet. I had every test in the book and nothing really showed up.

    Two years ago a new young doctor prescribed loratadine daily to help ease worsening asthma and allergies. Within four days my IBS began to clear. I mentioned this to young doc and he said that the IBS I had been experiencing could have been largely due to low-level food allergies that would not show up in the typical tests. I began re-introducing all the previously eliminated foods and found that there were very few that I couldn't add back now. With the improvement of my diet, my overall health improved! What startled me most in all this was that new young doc told me about these low-level allergies as though this were common knowledge, and clearly it isn't, since I have been part of several IBS groups over the years and we've always shared everything new, to help one another.

    I'm not saying that he said this is a cure-all, he said it helps some people. Since the meds I take are prescription strength, the involvement and oversight of a physician is necessary. But it might be worth a try. Good luck.
     
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    nana122401 responded:
    Mine is terrible and it happens everyday I'm getting to the point where I don't want to leave home. I believe I'm going to look into disability benefits, because I'm truly tired of all this trouble. I'm very depressed and I hate life, I feel suicidal but am to chicken to try. Life really sucks. I really wish there were some kind of help for people like us.
     
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    PEGABUCKS responded:
    hi,me again,you seem so desperate to me.i want to help you.i've been where you are.some time you have to take meds to cope with this.they help the depression,anxiety,ive been on them for years now.i was a total wreck of fear,anxiety,of having an episode,when i had to go out anywhere.they give you the courage you need to do these things.i also wear a diaper,you need spandex briefs to hold it in place.i feel more secure wearing it.it can save a lot of embarrassment.believe me.its very hard too live with,but you will do it.you have to learn different ways of doing things that work for you.i still cry alot .self pity.but well deserved.ive earned the right to feel sorry for myself sometimes,its just hard to deal at times.the imipramine that i mentioned before is an anti-depressent,side effects constipation,helps me.its not a cure but it does help me.well hang in there.i always pray for a cure,hopefully its on its way.take care peg


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