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    Nuclear stress test reversible ischemia
    avatar
    jensthreeangels posted:
    just received. report it says small to moderate area of decreased perfusion involving the anterolateral to apical wall of myocardium that appears smaller than on previous exam also there is some degree of septal thinning noted.
    on rest images, the small area of anterior apical wall reverses consistent with ischemia.
    ejection fraction is 71%. total severity score is 18 on rest and 142 on stress reversibility severity score is 11. please help explain this.. I've been having some pain, I don't see heart specialist till Tuesday. can you help explain what I could possibily be looking at..
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    "anterolateral to apical"

    The two main concerns regarding a nuclear stress test involves an actual narrowing or scarring, i.e., the findings of reversible (ischemia) or non-reversible (fixed, permanent, scar tissue) perfusion (blood flow) defects.

    After stress myocardial perfusion imaging (stress MPI), the patient's cardiologist may take some time to study the results of the scan before discussing the findings.

    One can typically expect one of the following four results -

    1:

    No perfusion defect after exercise or at rest

    The heart muscle and blood flow to the heart muscle appear to be normal.

    2:

    Perfusion defect after exercise, BUT NOT at rest (reversible defect)

    There is some degree of blockage in a coronary artery that interferes with the blood flow to the heart muscle. In someone with significant heart disease, when the heart works hard, it does not get the blood supply and oxygen that it needs (a supply 'n demand mismatch).

    At rest, however, the blood adequately reaches these areas or regions, e.g., ANTERIOR/ANTERO (front wall), POSTERIOR/POSTERO (back wall), INFERIOR/INFERO (lower area/lower wall area), Septal/Septum (dividing wall) APICAL/APEX (bottom tip of the heart) and LATERAL (side wall).

    The heart muscle has living cells/tissue in these areas. This indicates that clearing the blockage in the affected artery will be of benefit.

    3:

    Perfusion defect AFTER exercise AND at rest (fixed defect)

    There is one or more totally blocked coronary arteries and one has had damage done to the heart muscle because of a heart attack.

    There is an area/areas of the heart muscle that has become scar tissue (scarring, scarred) because of the heart attack.

    This area would not be able to make functional use of any oxygen even if blood flow to that area of the heart were completely restored.

    4:

    Combined reversible and fixed defects

    It is common for individuals with coronary artery disease to have different degrees of blockages in different arteries.

    A heart attack has left a fixed defect in one area of the heart, but there is a reversible defect in another area of the heart due to a less severe blockage.

    "ejection fraction is 71%."


    Cleveland Clinic

    Understanding Your Ejection Fraction

    http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/heartfailure/ejectionfraction.aspx

    .


    HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

    http://www.heartsite.com

    .

    Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s).


    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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    Heart Disease TYPES

    Men and Women

    Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

    Heart Disease SYMPTOMS

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

    Mayo Clinic

    Heart Disease

    Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Treatments and drugs. Prevention......

    Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of......

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

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    The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

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    How the Healthy Heart Works

    Arteries, Chambers, Valves

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works


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