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    high blood pressure
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    mamat54 posted:
    For the last couple of days my blood pressure has been a bit higher than normal. I take medications for high blood pressure which usually controls it pretty well, however I am dealing with a very sick sibling and think the stress may be contributing to it. At the moment it is at 169 over 92 with a pulse of 87. Should I go to the emergency room?
     
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    billh99 responded:
    Yes, stress is well known to increase blood pressure. And there are a few things that you can do to help control it. There are a number of relation methods. They include things like meditation, praying, deep breathing exercises. Also a walk out side.

    169/92 while high is well below emergency levels.

    Call you doctors office on Monday.

    Depending on your overall health they may said to wait a while, they may phone in a prescription change, or they may want you to come in.


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